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Department of Drama and Acting



Welcome



COURSE PROGRAM

 

FIRST YEAR

I. SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

U

K

EGL 101

English and Composition I

3

-

3

THE 101

Acting I

2

6

5

THE 103

Voice and Speech I

1

2

2

THE 105

Ear Training-Solfege I

1

2

2

THE 107

Singing I

1

2

2

THE 109

Movement I

2

2

3

THE 111

Dance I

-

2

1

THE 113

History of Theater I: Origins to Renaissance

3

-

3

THE 115

Dramaturgy: Textual Interpretation & Analysis I

3

-

3

THE 117

Scenography I

2

2

3

NH 001

National History I

NC

-

-

TOPLAM

 

18

18

27

 














II. SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

U

K

EGL 102

English and Composition II

3

-

3

THE 102

Acting II

2

6

5

THE 104

Voice and Speech II

1

2

2

THE 106

Ear Training-Solfege II

1

2

2

THE 108

Singing II

1

2

2

THE 110

Movement II

2

2

3

THE 112

Dance II

-

2

1

THE 114

History of Theater II: Renaissance to 20th Cent.

3

-

3

THE 116

Dramaturgy: Textual Interpretation & Analysis II

3

-

3

THE 118

Scenography II

2

2

3

NH 002

National History II

NC

-

-

TOPLAM

 

18

18

27

 

 

 

 

SECOND YEAR

III. SEMESTER

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

U

K

THE 201

Acting III

2

8

6

THE 203

Voice and Speech III

1

2

2

THE 205

Ear Training-Solfege III

1

2

2

THE 207

Singing III

1

2

2

THE 209

Movement III

1

4

3

THE 211

Dance III

-

2

1

THE 213

History of Theater III: 20th Century

3

-

3

THE 215

Dramaturgy: Textual Interpretation & Analysis III

3

-

3

TURK 001

Turkish I

NC

-

-

TOPLAM

 

12

20

22

 

 

 

IV. SEMESTER

 

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

U

K

THE 202

Acting IV

2

8

6

THE 204

Voice and Speech IV

1

2

2

THE 208

Singing IV

1

2

2

THE 210

Movement IV

1

4

3

THE 212

Dance IV

1

2

2

THE 214

History of Theater IV: 20th Century

3

-

3

THE 216

Dramaturgy: Textual Interpretation & Analysis IV

3

-

3

TURK 002

Turkish II

NC

-

-

TOPLAM

 

12

18

21

 

 

 

 

THIRD YEAR

                V. SEMESTER

 

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

U

K

THE 301

Acting V

2

4

4

THE 303

Voice and Speech V

1

2

2

THE 307

Singing V

1

2

2

THE 311

Dance V

1

2

2

THE 313

History of Costume I

3

-

3

THE 315

Dramaturgy:Textual Interpretation & Analysis V

3

-

3

THE 317

Make-up I

1

1

2

THE 321

Elective I

1

2

2

THE 323

Project I

2

4

4

TOPLAM

 

15

17

24

 

                VI. SEMESTER

 

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

U

K

THE 302

Acting VI

2

4

4

THE 304

Voice and Speech VI

1

2

2

THE 308

Singing VI

1

2

2

THE 312

Dance VI

1

2

2

THE 314

History of Costume II

3

-

3

THE 316

Dramaturgy:Textual Interpretation & Analysis VI

3

-

3

THE 318

Make-up II

1

1

2

THE 322

Elective II

1

2

2

THE 324

Project II

2

4

4

TOPLAM

 

15

17

24

 

 

 

FOURTH YEAR

                VII. SEMESTER

 

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

U

K

THE 413

History of Turkish Theatre

3

-

3

THE 421

Elective III

1

2

2

THE 423

Project III

4

10

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOPLAM

 

8

12

14

 

               

VIII. SEMESTER

 

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

U

K

THE 422

Elective IV

1

2

2

THE 424

Project IV

4

10

9

THE 426

Elective V

1

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOPLAM

 

6

14

13

 

Kısaltmalar: T= Haftalık Teorik Ders Saati; U= Haftalık Uygulama Ders Saati; K= Dersin Kredisi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Electives:

 

Dancesport: Latin

Dancesport: Standard

Introduction to Psychology

History of Civilization

Studio Voice I/II

Class Piano I/II

Dramatic Writing

Directing

Brecht Theatre

Commedia del’ Arte

Theater Management

Acting Shakespeare

Acting Chekhov

Guitar


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

EGL 101/102 English and Composition I/II (3-0)3

I: The central basis of English and Composition I is to introduce students to an academic approach to thinking, reading, speaking and writing in an integrated, meaningful manner such that they are able to apply the skills learnt to their departmental studies. In addition, this course aims to further develop the students` linguistic accuracy and range in English.

II: The central basis of English and Composition II is to consolidate students` academic approach to thinking, reading, speaking and writing and language usage, as initiated in English and Composition I. In addition, this course aims to develop the students` abilities to synthesise and evaluate information and conduct basic, independent research. Prerequisite: English and Composition I.

 

THE 101/102 Acting I/II (2-6)5

An introduction to the dynamics of the actor`s art, focusing on individual self-awareness, spontaneity and expressiveness. Open to freshmen theatre majors, this course is a beginning acting class for non-majors. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of acting that include action, relaxation, objective, spontaneity, emotion, monologues, texts, projection, presence, substitution, referential movement, character analyses, heightened diction, and score. The course includes a working knowledge of Stanislavski’s system, Method, and Meisner acting techniques in voice, gesture, physical control, observation and discovery. It will include ideas about the rehearsal process, play scripts, scenes, staging, and performance. Improvisation, exercises, and games will be done in each class to facilitate learning and self-discovery.

Students work on basic acting skills such as developing the ability to produce free, imaginative, and purposeful behavior in relation to environments, objects, and other persons; individual silent exercises; and group exercises. This work leads to in-class performances of selected scenes from a variety of American contemporary plays with special focus given to the sensory requirements in the text.

I: Fundamentals of Acting I is an introduction to the elements of performance, including exercises in concentration, sensory awareness, relaxation, communication, imagination, observation. It is based on the development of theatrical creativity through objectives, obstacles, action, conflict, spontaneity. It aims to develop an understanding of the dramatic situation.

II: Fundamentals of Acting II is the continuation of Fundamentals of Acting I and it emphasizes developing creative expression through theatre exercises, improvisations and scenes. It aims at preparing and presenting scenes in class, preparing written scenes and character analyses, attending plays, and writing performance critiques. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Acting I.

 

THE 103/104/203/204/303/304 Voice and Speech I/II/III/IV/V/VI (1-2)2

The voice and speech courses focus on practical work such as freeing the releasing the breath, breath capacity, placement, muscularity, support, pitch/range, resonance and rooting/grounding. Eventually, communication and language are introduced with emphasis on imagery and heightened speech.

I: Devoted to the examination and practice of the basic principles of breathing, resonance, articulation, diaphragm support, pitch, rhythm and expressiveness, placement and diction. This first module focuses primarily on the basics of speech and phonetics.

II: The course aims to help students integrate voice, breath, and text. It concentrates on the formation of the individual sounds of spoken Turkish and the development of ability to speak clearly, expressively and without impediments. Second module deals with articulation as it is applied to various types of text. Prerequisite: Voice and Speech I.

III/IV: The course is a continuation of the first-year work, which now becomes integrated into the rehearsal of the second-year acting studio. Development of the student`s vocal instrument as an integrated organic function of self and character. Prerequisite: Voice and Speech II.

V/VI: The course focuses on building power and range by developing breath muscles of the ribs and diaphragm, limbering the resonators of the chest, mouth, teeth, sinus, nasal, and skull, and finally, work on the entire range of the voice. It aims to help students work through spoken text through their own creative writing, sonnets, and monologues, dialogues, which are all rehearsed and performed. Prerequisite: Voice and Speech III/IV.

 

THE 105/106/205 Ear Training-Solfege I/II/III (1-2)2

The study of eartraining and sightsinging utilizing diatonic materials. Course content includes the recognition of intervals, scales and modes, as well as dictation of melodic, harmonic and rhythmic material reinforcing concepts.

I: Fundamental properties of sound, elementary acoustics. basic structural elements of music. Music notation: time and pitch, rhythm, meter, tempo, musical time, staff, solfege syllables, accidentals. designation of pitch, duration, tempo, expressions and dynamics. Intervals and scales. methods of musical dictation: Basic reading skills: one part solo solfege- Sol and Fa keys.

II: Chords: Designation of chords. Written and aural exercises on these subjects. Dictation of two period one-part, two-part 16 measures dictees containing mixed rhythms, syncopation. Introduction to collective solfege. The solo and collective musical reading and simultaneous sight singing of repertoire consisting of these musical criteria. Prerequisite: Ear Training-Solfege I.

III: More challenging exercises given in sight-singing and preparation of increasingly chromatic or disjunct materials. Melodic, harmonic, two-part, and rhythmic dictation. Two-part rhythmic exercises and conducting. This course addresses the aural recognition and cognition of chromatic and modulatory tonal melodies in bass, treble, and alto clefs. Also covers division and subdivision of beats in simple and compound meter. The material includes all triads and seventh chords with primary and secondary functions. Prerequisite: Ear Training-Solfege I/II.

 

THE 107 Singing I (1-2)2

A general introductory course designed to enhance listening enjoyment and ability. Emphasis on the elements of music, the characteristic styles of major historical periods, and the lives and works of key composers within the Western musical tradition. Course includes in-class demonstrations and attendance at outside musical events. No previous musical study required.

 

THE 108/207/208/307/308 Singing  II/III/IV/V/VI (1-2)2

Establishing basic vocal technique for musical theatre singing, including vocal exercises and breathing technique. Application of technique through the study of beginning level Broadway up-tempos and ballads as well as Turkish, English art song and American folk song.

II: A course designed to expand the vocal range, power and imagination of the actor. Exercises to develop a vocal warmup that focuses on breathing, releasing muscular tension throughout the body, and finding the organic connection between feeling and sound production. Students learn the rudiments of anatomy and physiology in relation to vocal production. Acting improvisations and poetry direct the actor to greater expression.

III: This course accommodates students at various performing levels who wish to gain proficiency in the three essential components of music theatre: voice, dance and acting. Voice topics follow the creation, theory and analysis and include sound production, breathing, diction, range, intonation, projection, interpretation, ear training and sight-singing. Theory instruction accommodates students at various levels and involves learning the symbols, concepts and conventions used in music as they apply to vocal music. Students will perform choral music from various cultures and create music theatre pieces culminating in a public performance. Emphasis on exercises that focus on breath management, resonance, articulation and vocal dynamics. Storytelling and texts that are rich in imagery will be used to increase the actor`s vocal range and responsiveness.

IV: This course continues to build on the skills developed encompassing the three-area; theory, creation and analysis. Students will study the elements of music, demonstrate the principles of proper vocal training and focus creatively on music creation. Students will participate in choirs and ensembles.

V: By the end of this course, students will demonstrate the ability to notate rhythmic patterns, melodies and chords accurately. This course emphasizes the appreciation, analysis and performance of music theatre repertoire. Students will perform technical exercises, complete detailed creative activities, and analyze and evaluate live and recorded performances. They will continue to increase their understanding of the elements of music while developing their technical and imaginative abilities. Students will participate in choirs and ensembles culminating musical.

VI: This course explores aspects of vocal production, including sight-reading, analyzing musical material, tone and vocal quality. Students will also receive instruction on selection and interpretation of selected musical material. Students will perform ensemble and solo repertoires. Learning strategies include attending live performances, examining films and participation in master classes. Students will participate in choirs, ensembles, and make up the ensemble of the spring culminating musical. In addition to Broadway repertoire students will explore units in jazz, opera and a graduation showcase.

 

THE 109/110/209/210 Movement I/II/III/IV (2-2)3 / (1-4)3

This course brings actors to a deeper awareness of the physical side of acting; increases movement sensitivity, skills, and focus; and provides a wider range of choices in the development of character. It provides the foundation for mind/body awareness that is the cornerstone of movement training for the graduate actor. Basic experiential anatomy will be addressed to support the mind/body connection students will be developing. Attention to movement re-education and re-patterning will be focussed through close investigation of principles such as relaxation, concentration, coordination, alignment, breathing, flowing movements, centering, and stamina. Related supplemental readings are an important part of the course material provided, and the required text an invaluable aid. Guided instruction and personal awareness are essential to the teaching/learning process. Students must demonstrate active participation and self-motivation in order to progress.

I: The course is based on the fundamentals of theatrical stage movement for actors, rooted in the techniques of Allan Wayne Work and developmental movement patterns. Students learn exercises to increase strength, flexibility, coordination, and stamina.

II: Through practical exercises and related reading, the course introduces students to the basic skills of communicating through movement, including: relaxation, coordination and alignment, and spatial relationships. All exercises are based on the principles of the Alexander Technique of movement re-education, which leads to greater poise and physical expression. The course continues the fundamentals of theatrical stage movement for actors begun in Movement I. In addition to advancing in their knowledge and mastery of these exercises, students apply these principles to individual and ensemble movement-improvisation. Prerequisite: Movement I.

III: Basic techniques of stage combat including hand-to-hand, falls, rolls, flips, and dives. Building upon the techniques learned in Movement I/II, students in this course combine these techniques into compositional exercises.  Prerequisite: Movement I/II.

IV: Building upon the techniques learned in Movement III, students in this course explore imagination, character, and story within non-verbal physical theater. Prerequisite: Movement III.

 

 THE 111/112 Dance I/II (0-2)1

I/II: Students will obtain a basic understanding of ballet principles through practical application including basic theory, body mechanics, alignment, and execution of ballet vocabulary with rhythmic acuity.  Students will gain practical experience in the execution of selected ballet vocabulary in barre work, center work and complex floor combinations.  There will be an emphasis on developing strength, control, and flexibility, for a technique vocabulary in classical ballet.  Selected students will have the opportunity to begin pointe work and develop their execution in a precise and physiologically sound manner. Apart from the fundamentals of Floor-Barre Technique, the modules also introduce students to fundamentals of contemporary modern dance technique, as well as place an emphasis on creating original dance choreography.

 

THE 113 History of Theater I: Origins to Renaissance (3-0)3

Through a combination of lecture and discussion the course is an exploration of the history of world theatre from the Greeks to Shakespeare. Students learn about staging practices, the cultural use of theatrical space, the changing status of theatre within various cultures, and the role of the audience, the playwright, and the actor in theatrical performance. A study of the evolution of theatre from the ancient world to the Renaissance. Students read a series of plays by the major playwrights. These are discussed as reflections of the changing physical theatre, as well as the social, political and artistic currents of each period. The emphasis is on the theatre of the West, although the course may trace conventions and consider some of the drama from the theatre of the East and other non-Western traditions.

 

THE 114 History of Theater II: Renaissance to 20th Century (3-0)3

A study of development of western theatre from the 17th century to the 20th century. The course aims to emphasize the idea of theatre, the development of dramatic forms, the evolution of theatre architecture, the relationship between actor and audience and productions of these historical periods in the western theatre. Post-Renaissance theatre through the rise of realism and naturalism to the grounds of modern theatre practice. The course relates dramatic literature to emerging ideas of acting, directing, stage design, as well as new forms of theatre architecture and new concepts of performance. Prerequisite: History of Theater I: Origins to Renaissance.

 

THE 115/116/215/216/315/316 Dramaturgy: Textual Interpretation and Analysis I/II/III/IV/V/VI (3-0)3

The analysis of major theatrical works from various theoretical perspectives. The purpose of the course is to enable actors, directors, designers and critics to acquire analytic tools necessary to decode the dramatic text and to apply that knowledge to production. Coursework will range from literary and structural analysis to acted excerpts, design renderings and production concepts.

I/II: A close study of dramatic texts and source material, with emphasis on dramaturgical praxis, including an overview of the history/theory of dramaturgy from Ancient Greece to Renaissance.

III/IV: The course aims to make analysis of dramatic texts, with special emphasis on play structure, plot, character, dialogue, ideas, and various other elements essential to effective theatrical interpretation and realization from Renaissance to Realism.

V: A survey of some diverse ways of analyzing scripts for dramatic production. The course aims to define different roles and different tools, and aims to choose from a veritable smorgasbord of methods. It is based on theatrical interpretation and realization from Realism to Avantgarde. The course explores critical methods based on psychoanalysis, cognitive science, Marxism, the various feminisms, and historicism. Prerequisite: Dramaturgy: Textual Interpretation and Analysis I/II/III/IV.

VI: A survey of some diverse ways of analyzing scripts for dramatic production. This module aims to define different roles and different tools, and aims to choose from a veritable smorgasbord of methods. It is based on theatrical interpretation and realization from Realism to Avantgarde. The courses explores critical methods based on psychoanalysis, cognitive science, Marxism, the various feminisms, historicism.

 

THE 117/118 Scenography I/II (2-2)3

In this course, technical tools such as set, costume and light are examined within different  periods; from ancient Greek to the present day, with respect to the evolution in the construction of theatrical venues/stages. Also, cross-section, perspective and isometric drawing are taught together with realization of stage plans.

 

THE 201/202/301/302 Acting III/IV/V/VI (2-8)6 / (2-4)4

Long after the impact of Brecht, Artaud, Grotowski, Lecoq and Peter Brook, the art and practice of acting is still turning on the revelations and teachings of Constantine Stanislavsky. If the Stanislavsky “system” or “method” is applied literally, it leads merely to realism, but applied systematically with discrimination it can become the grammar of all styles. While based on the teachings of Stanislavsky, this course includes insights by other famous acting teachers such as Uta Hagen, Sanford Meisner, Lee Strasberg, Michael Chekhov and Stella Adler. This is an initial acting course with a focus on the practical and playable aspects of the “system’s” training, providing the actor with a resource to operate completely on his or her own in any and all production situations. Studio course with lab requirement.

III: The course aims to explore experientially and analytically the foundation of the acting process based on Stanislavski`s System and The Method of Physical Actions. It is based on characterization, roles, special problems, and application of acting techniques through exercises and two-character scenes from the Ancient Greek and Realist plays. Building a character and playing the scene. Exercises in observation, behavior patterns, diction, the psychology of character, problems of motivation, the division of action into units and objectives are carried out. Gradually, the student learns to define action through given circumstances and develop the arc of performance in a particular setting.

IV: Sequel to Acting I. The course aims to explore experientially and analytically the foundation of the acting process based on Stanislavski`s System and The Method of Physical Actions. It is based on characterization, roles, special problems, and application of acting techniques through exercises and three or more character scenes from the Ancient Greek and Realist plays. Prerequisite: Acting III.

V/VI: This course aims to cover historical theories and techniques of styles of acting: from the neoclassical periods to contemporary styles. Students study acting text for clues to character behavior and motivation fleshed out during the rehearsal process in preparation for performance. Scenes may be presented formally during performance weeks. Students will participate in a collaborative and creative process to devise short theatre pieces inspired by a chosen theme or topic. Sources can include literature, visual art, music, current or historical events, or student biographies. Using research assignments, in-class exercises, and improvisation, students will transform source material into original performances. Students will develop acting skills throughout the process. Prerequisite: Acting IV.

 

THE 211/212 Dance III/IV (0-2)1 / (1-2)2

III/IV: Students will continue to expand and deepen their understanding of modern dance history and demonstrate by example modern dance vocabulary. Students will continue to gain practical experience in movement invention and be able to identify the elements of time, space and energy as they pertain to all dance forms and demonstrate by example a working knowledge of applied anatomy and kinesiology. Students will work to deepen their awareness of movement initiation, dynamics and quality.

Students will obtain a basic understanding of contemporary as well as classical jazz techniques.  The student is required to develop a variety of dance skills, both technical and rhythmical.  The course will build on the fundamentals learned in Jazz Dance I.  The class will increase the student’s vocabulary by introducing a variety of turns and leaps and the methods and mechanics to stronger dancing.  This class will work on correct alignment and strength needed to improve turning techniques and to jump more efficiently.  There is an emphasis on the importance of energy, style, and rhythmical accuracy.

A variety of skills will be developed to increase a dancer’s tap dance vocabulary and develop rhythmical accuracy in the production of sounds in fundamental steps.  The students will be required to recognize and perform various tap dance routines as well as executing the routines to selected music in combinations.  Students will be expected to create pre-set tap routines and fit original combinations to selected music.

 

THE 213/214 History of Theater III/IV: 20th Century (3-0)3

A study of contemporary drama and dramatic theory, and its development from early 20th century models, with particular emphasis on contemporary dramatic theory.  The development of many new forms of theatre, including modernism, expressionism, political theatre and other forms of experimental theatre, as well as the continuing development of already established theatrical forms like naturalism and realism will be explored. 

Survey of musical theatre history, theory, and criticism from its beginnings in the early 20th century to the present ; study of representative plays. Historical evolution of musical theatre. Ideas, styles, and contributions of the mature musical`s most influential creative artists. This course will follow the changing form and content of the American musical. After a brief summary of early American musical plays, revues and operettas, the major part of this course will concentrate on innovations that have changed these old forms into the modern musical. These changes also will reflect changing social patterns in the United States. Some original sources will be compared with the resulting musicals. Films, recordings and live singers will be used in the class.

 

THE 313/14 History of Costume I/II (3-0) 3

A theoretical introduction to the artistic and aesthetic aspects of costume. Students will examine the psychology of clothing and how styles developed through different historical periods. Fashion, mirroring societal changes, will be studied as an outcome of class struggle, politics, economics and attitudes toward the human body. The course will cover a study of the process involved in the creation of clothing for the stage by examining clothing in its historical context through the use of film, slides, guest lecturers and department productions. Students will learn to read and analyze scripts with an eye to discovering the finer points of gender, class, rank and age. Lectures may reinforce these concepts by allowing students to work on specific projects related to departmental productions.

 

THE 317/18 Make-up I/II (1-1) 2

I/II: This course seeks to illuminate the actor’s quest for character through a concise, easily understood exploration of the connection between makeup and character, emphasizing the total visual impact of the character on the audience and discussing in depth the contribution of props and costume to the overall effect. The course is intended to help performers. Students bridge the gap between understanding a role and expressing that understanding in tangible form.

The student develops techniques for creating realistic, stylized and character makeup for the stage. There is an emphasis on practical application and research. Specific projects are assigned. This course covers: face analysis, nude make-ups, powders, concealing, highlighting to create a finished look, modern and period make-ups, how the past influences current make-up styles, make-up styles: wedding and special occasions, glamour, make-up continuity. It explores the basic theory and practice, the design purpose, tools, and methods of stage make-up to see how it enriches the meaning of the drama.

 

THE 311/312 Dance V/VI: (1-2)2

V/VI: Application of musical theatre performance technique utilizing scenes from the Broadway stage. Study includes using show research and script analysis to develop characterization. Emphasis is placed on creating unified performance both dramatically and musically. Study includes larger scene-song forms including one-acts or new-works from the musical theatre. The course also includes advanced performance course in dance skills for the musical stage; jazz, tap, hip-hop, and ballroom dancing. The purpose of this course is to fully explore the sources of dramatic action that reside in the self, in the acting partner, and in the circumstances. The course explores the movement and dramatic aspects of music theatre. The course will include an introduction to dramatic and dance technique where students will construct, discuss, perform and analyze those art forms. It continues the exploration of the movement and dramatic aspects of music theatre. The course will build on the skills regarding dramatic and dance technique learned.

 

THE 323/324/423/424 Project I/II/III/IV (2-4)4 / (4-10)9

I/II: The course requires working with a director and being in whole process to constitute a play. Beginning with a play, participants spend the term exploring a social and historical context for the script, as well as studying the writer`s background. The research is incorporated into the rehearsal process, which culminates in a fully staged production. 

III/IV: Sequel to Project I/II. The course requires working with another director and being in whole process to constitute a play. Prerequisite: Project I/II.

 

THEA 413 History of Turkish Theatre (3-0) 3

This module focuses on the changes and evolution of Turkish Theatre from 1839 to the present and Traditional Turkish Theatre. 

 

______________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Electives (1-2)2

Dancesport: Latin

This course provides intensive practice and information as to internationally recognized syllabi regarding at least two of the Latin-American dances which are cha cha cha, samba, rumba, pasodoble and jive. By two-hour weekly practical workshops primarily based on “Professional and Amateur Dance Syllabus” by International Dance Teachers Association, “The Laird Technique of Latin Dancing” by Walter Laird and “Popular Variations in Latin American Dancing” by Imperial Society of Teachers of Dance-Dance Examinations Board.  Short presentations given by instructor or students will also take place as appropriate. Some reading and viewing of video material might be necessary.

 

Dancesport: Standard

This course provides intensive practice and information as to internationally recognized syllabi regarding at least two of the ballroom standard dances which are tango, viennese waltz, foxtrot, slow waltz and quickstep. By two-hour weekly practical workshops primarily based on “Professional and Amateur Dance Syllabus” by International Dance Teachers Association and “Technique of Ballroom Dancing” by Guy Howard.  Short presentations given by instructor or students will also take place as appropriate. Some reading and viewing of video material might be necessary.

 

Introduction to Psychology I

This course is designed for students from other departments in order to give them a general knowledge of psychology. The course provides a general understanding of psychological inquiry, major theories and their practical applications. The topics covered include sensation and perception, theories of learning and memory, development, socialization, personality, social psychology.

 

History of Civilization

The course analyzes the term “civilization” and deals with the basic questions of definitions and of the civilizing process. Students are introduced to the history of civilizations through a comparative perspective and the points of a common human civilizing process. Plurality within human civilizations is emphasized.

 

Studio Voice I/II

I: Development of musical theatre performance technique through the study of solo song. Study includes exploring aspects of interpretation and expression to support the vocal, physical and mental aspects of performing. Emphasis is placed on integrating singing and acting skills. Expand analytical and performance skills through extended song forms. Study includes breath, body and visualization techniques to continue integrating vocal, physical and mental aspects of performing.

II: Continuing practice of vocal technique for musical theatre singing; includes developing range, flexibility and tone color. Application of technique through the study of intermediate level Broadway up-tempos and ballads, as well as Italian art song and European operetta.

 

Class Piano I/II

I: Introductory piano for the music major with little or no prior keyboard study. Emphasizes development of basic keyboard skills, music reading, and conceptual understanding pertinent to early level study. Includes introduction to transposition, harmonization, sight reading, improvisation, and basic keyboard repertoire.

II: Continued group piano study for the non-keyboard music major. Emphasizes major and minor scales, arpeggios, chord inversions, seventh chords, modes, and pedaling, as well as further exploration of transposition, harmonization, sight reading, improvisation, and later elementary-level repertoire.

Note: This course can also be changed toGroup Piano for Non-Music Majors” for a group of applicants to provide an introduction to the basics of piano playing, including keyboard skills, musical notation, aural awareness, music theory fundamentals, and elementary repertoire. Designed to accommodate students with little or no prior musical training.

 

Dramatic Writing

This course will both expose you to the fundamental principles and techniques of dramatic writing – both for the stage and the screen – and encourage you, the dramatist, to relate these principles and techniques to the stories that you are passionate about revealing to an audience.  While certainly focussing on the “tools” that enable dramatists to tell their story, and while also speaking to the practical concerns of writing for the stage and/or the screen, you will be encouraged to “release” your own writer’s voice through allowing that voice to speak “boldly” and without fear.

 

Directing

Student based production: Choosing, rehearsing, and staging a theatrical piece under regular academic supervision. Students are given full guidance and support to stage a theatrical text from scratch and perform it to an audience.   

Brecht Theatre

The course begins by examining Brecht`s theories and practice in the theatre and goes on to trace his possible subsequent influence, theoretic and stylistic, on the world of theatrical practices since the fifties, assessing what forms and tactics contribute most to `political theatre` and discussing various forms of political theatre and their effectiveness. Students will also rehearse scenes selected from epic theatre.

 

Commedia del’ Arte

Offers an opportunity to explore the work and history of the actor-creator, the actor for whom the empty space, the ensemble and the audience are equal partners. As a living theater form commedia del’ Arte no longer exists, but the study of the masks, improvisational techniques, lazzi and scenario provide the contemporary actor with a challenging container in which to explore essential human archetypes and relationships as well as the art of comedy. Lectures cover background with studio work and seminars built around improvised scenes along with scenes and monologues that are to be rehearsed outside the class for performance and critique during class. Studio course with Lab requirement.

 

Theater Management  

Through lecture, discussion and projects, the student learns about styles of theater management, and companies with a variety of management structures. The course focuses on American not-for-profit companies, with strategies for board development, financial management, marketing and ticket sales, promotion, arts advocacy, and fund-raising.

 

Acting Shakespeare

The course begins with helping the student to feel the very heartbeat of the work, the students/actors have to know how to decipher and understand a text that may feel strange on the tongue, and they have to discover the text’s tone and tempo, mine its inner richness, and learn how to speak the text with ease. Lectures cover background with studio work and seminars built around improvised scenes along with scenes and monologues that are to be rehearsed outside the class for performance and critique during class. Studio course with Lab requirement.

 

Acting Chekhov

Scene study of the great Russian playwright Anton Chekhov.

 

Guitar

Introductory guitar for the music major with little or no prior keyboard study. Emphasizes development of basic finger skills, music reading, and conceptual understanding pertinent to early level study. Includes introduction to transposition, harmonization, sight reading, improvisation, and basic guitar repertoire.